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Celebrating Santa Margarita

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Procession of Santa Margarita – 2015

Once again this year, we celebrated our “patronal feast,” that is, the day of the saint after whom our church is named.  Saint Margaret of Antioch (Santa Margarita) is commemorated on 20 July.

Within the tradition of the church, we sometimes move the observance of feast days, and to make it easier to accommodate those who work during the week, and our Menorquin neighbours, we planned the celebration for the eve, 19 July.

As before, we processed from the church of El Roser in Es Castell to Santa Margarita.  This year, our procession was embellished by musical accompaniment from the “Colla de Geganters i Grallers des Castell,” who played their traditional “grallers” or flutes, and drums.

We were also graced by the presence of an interviewer and cameraman from IB3 television.

We were asked why we do this, and whether any other Anglican congregation does a similar thing.  I answered that while Anglican parishes do customarily celebrate patronal feast days, I do not know of any that do it in quite this way.

Santa Margarita’s day falls within the period of the fiesta of Es Castell (Sant Jaume, or Santiago, or Saint James), and it seems to me to be appropriate to immerse ourselves in the spirit of fiesta with the citizens of the community in which we are blessed to live.

There is also some symbolism in carrying Santa Margarita from the Roman Catholic church to our own chapel, as the generosity of the Roman Catholic parish flows towards our own community of faith, giving us a place in which to worship, and from which to undertake our ministry.

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  1. Sacred Spaces | Anglican Church in Menorca - 2015/08/15

    […] The procession and celebration of Santa Margarita took place, as planned, on the evening of 19 July.  Anglican parishes do customarily celebrate patronal feast days, but I do not know of any that do it in quite this way.  Santa Margarita’s day falls within the period of the fiesta of Es Castell (Sant Jaume, or Santiago, or Saint James), and it seems to be appropriate to immerse ourselves in the spirit of fiesta with the citizens of the community in which we are blessed to live.  There is also some symbolism in carrying the statue of Santa Margarita from the Roman Catholic church to our own chapel, as the generosity of the Roman Catholic parish flows towards our own community of faith, giving us a place in which to worship, and from which to undertake our ministry. […]

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